NATHAN HACKETT

Australian Creative Director - VFX living in San Francisco.

Adobe & The Frog

Produced by Triune Films in collaboration with Adobe Systems.

Shot, Directed and Edited by: Ryan Connolly: https://twitter.com/ryan_connolly

Written by: 

Seth Worley & Ryan Connolly

VFX by:

Michael Stark - https://twitter.com/mstarktv

Seth Worley - https://twitter.com/Awakeland3D

Bryan James - https://twitter.com/BryanLJames

Tim Allen - https://twitter.com/timmy_allen

Music by:

Ben Worley - https://twitter.com/subtumble

Cast:

Josh Connolly - (The Editor): https://twitter.com/Josh_connolly

Chase Austin - (Premiere): https://twitter.com/ItsChaseAustin

Catherine Graass - (After Effects): https://twitter.com/cgraass

Chuck Kourouklis - (The Frog)

Shot on the Canon C500 with Canon Cinema zoom lenses. Recorded RAW to ODYSSEY 7Q. 

Rental house: http://www.lensprotogo.com

- Edited in Adobe Premiere CC

- CG character rendered in After Effects CC using Element 3D

- Color graded using Magic Bullet Looks

“Life After Pi” is a short documentary about Rhythm & Hues Studios, the L.A. based Visual Effects company that won an Academy Award for its groundbreaking work on “Life of Pi”– just two weeks after declaring bankruptcy. The film explores rapidly changing forces impacting the global VFX community, and the Film Industry as a whole.

This is only the first chapter of an upcoming feature-length documentary “Hollywood Ending,” that delves into the larger, complex challenges facing the US Film Industry and the many professionals working within it, whose fates and livelihood are intertwined.

http://www.hollywoodendingmovie.com/

Some of these I am still trying to work out…

ILM’s breakdown of Pacific Rim…

VFX Porn at it’s finest

Phil Tippett answers questions about VFX on Reddit
http://tk.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/1r5h9b/im_phil_tippett_stopmotion_animator_director/
This is the first answer…. I love him… He is the insight our industry needs.
——
In the olden days, producers knew what visual effects were. Now they’ve gotten into this methodology where they’ll hire a middleman – a visual effects supervisor, and this person works for the producing studio. They’re middle managers. And when you go into a review with one of them, there’s this weird sort of competition that happens. It’s a game called ‘Find What’s Wrong With This Shot’. And there’s always going to be something wrong, because everything’s subjective. And you can micromanage it down to a pixel, and that happens all the time. We’re doing it digitally, so there’s no pressure to save on film costs or whatever, so it’s not unusual to go through 500 revisions of the same shot, moving pixels around and scrutinizing this or that. That’s not how you manage artists. You encourage artists, and then you’ll get – you know – art. If your idea of managing artists is just pointing out what’s wrong and making them fix it over and over again, you end up with artists who just stand around asking “OK lady, where do you want this sofa? You want it over there? No? Fine. You want it over there? I don’t give a fuck. I’ll put it wherever you want it.” It’s creative mismanagement, it’s part of the whole corporate modality. The fish stinks from the head on down. Back on Star Wars, Robocop, we never thought about what was wrong with a shot. We just thought about how to make it better.

Phil Tippett answers questions about VFX on Reddit

http://tk.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/1r5h9b/im_phil_tippett_stopmotion_animator_director/

This is the first answer…. I love him… He is the insight our industry needs.

——

In the olden days, producers knew what visual effects were. Now they’ve gotten into this methodology where they’ll hire a middleman – a visual effects supervisor, and this person works for the producing studio. They’re middle managers. And when you go into a review with one of them, there’s this weird sort of competition that happens. It’s a game called ‘Find What’s Wrong With This Shot’. And there’s always going to be something wrong, because everything’s subjective. And you can micromanage it down to a pixel, and that happens all the time. We’re doing it digitally, so there’s no pressure to save on film costs or whatever, so it’s not unusual to go through 500 revisions of the same shot, moving pixels around and scrutinizing this or that. That’s not how you manage artists. You encourage artists, and then you’ll get – you know – art. If your idea of managing artists is just pointing out what’s wrong and making them fix it over and over again, you end up with artists who just stand around asking “OK lady, where do you want this sofa? You want it over there? No? Fine. You want it over there? I don’t give a fuck. I’ll put it wherever you want it.” It’s creative mismanagement, it’s part of the whole corporate modality. The fish stinks from the head on down. Back on Star Wars, Robocop, we never thought about what was wrong with a shot. We just thought about how to make it better.

Creating the world of Oblivion

A great interview with Joe Kosinski, David Lewandowski and Gmunk (Bradley Munkowitz)

Hollywood’s History of Faking It | The Evolution of Greenscreen Compositing

Interesting history lesson on Film and Mattes

From Phil Tippett himself…
Tippett Studio would like to clarify what we feel was a misleading headline and article in HollywoodReporter.com today.
Given the current climate and environment affecting movies and visual effects production today, Tippett Studio has made a business decision, as we routinely do, to reduce our contract-based work force as the projects ebb and flow through our doors. 
Staffing up is easy. Scaling down is not. It’s always an emotionally challenging thing, because we are a company of artists, run by artists. By doing a slow scale-down as tasks and projects complete, we aim to keep our employees on as long as we can, and to bring them back as soon as possible.
We are not immune to the problems our colleagues are experiencing, but we are not in a period of crisis as a company with massive layoffs and bankruptcy. As a small, independent company, we are delighted when we have a series, such as the Twilight Saga,and then Ted that allowed us to maintain a sizable workforce year after year.
As we wrap our current work on After Earth, we have been slowly scaling down the work force and reducing our overhead, until we have something large enough to justify carrying a large staff, so that we can be here when our clients call. We are retaining our core talent, and will use that talent to re-staff the studio when larger projects, that need more artists, are in production.
———
Creativity of Death

From Phil Tippett himself…

Tippett Studio would like to clarify what we feel was a misleading headline and article in HollywoodReporter.com today.

Given the current climate and environment affecting movies and visual effects production today, Tippett Studio has made a business decision, as we routinely do, to reduce our contract-based work force as the projects ebb and flow through our doors. 

Staffing up is easy. Scaling down is not. It’s always an emotionally challenging thing, because we are a company of artists, run by artists. By doing a slow scale-down as tasks and projects complete, we aim to keep our employees on as long as we can, and to bring them back as soon as possible.

We are not immune to the problems our colleagues are experiencing, but we are not in a period of crisis as a company with massive layoffs and bankruptcy. As a small, independent company, we are delighted when we have a series, such as the Twilight Saga,and then Ted that allowed us to maintain a sizable workforce year after year.

As we wrap our current work on After Earth, we have been slowly scaling down the work force and reducing our overhead, until we have something large enough to justify carrying a large staff, so that we can be here when our clients call. We are retaining our core talent, and will use that talent to re-staff the studio when larger projects, that need more artists, are in production.

———

Creativity of Death

As usual, Stu Maschwitz nails it when it comes to VFX and the Oscars.
Great read.
http://prolost.com/pi

As usual, Stu Maschwitz nails it when it comes to VFX and the Oscars.

Great read.

http://prolost.com/pi

Sin CIty - The All Green Screen Version

This is what we see, but also shows you how much we add to a film.