NATHAN HACKETT

Australian Creative Director - VFX living in San Francisco.
Phil Tippett answers questions about VFX on Reddit
http://tk.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/1r5h9b/im_phil_tippett_stopmotion_animator_director/
This is the first answer…. I love him… He is the insight our industry needs.
——
In the olden days, producers knew what visual effects were. Now they’ve gotten into this methodology where they’ll hire a middleman – a visual effects supervisor, and this person works for the producing studio. They’re middle managers. And when you go into a review with one of them, there’s this weird sort of competition that happens. It’s a game called ‘Find What’s Wrong With This Shot’. And there’s always going to be something wrong, because everything’s subjective. And you can micromanage it down to a pixel, and that happens all the time. We’re doing it digitally, so there’s no pressure to save on film costs or whatever, so it’s not unusual to go through 500 revisions of the same shot, moving pixels around and scrutinizing this or that. That’s not how you manage artists. You encourage artists, and then you’ll get – you know – art. If your idea of managing artists is just pointing out what’s wrong and making them fix it over and over again, you end up with artists who just stand around asking “OK lady, where do you want this sofa? You want it over there? No? Fine. You want it over there? I don’t give a fuck. I’ll put it wherever you want it.” It’s creative mismanagement, it’s part of the whole corporate modality. The fish stinks from the head on down. Back on Star Wars, Robocop, we never thought about what was wrong with a shot. We just thought about how to make it better.

Phil Tippett answers questions about VFX on Reddit

http://tk.reddit.com/r/IAmA/comments/1r5h9b/im_phil_tippett_stopmotion_animator_director/

This is the first answer…. I love him… He is the insight our industry needs.

——

In the olden days, producers knew what visual effects were. Now they’ve gotten into this methodology where they’ll hire a middleman – a visual effects supervisor, and this person works for the producing studio. They’re middle managers. And when you go into a review with one of them, there’s this weird sort of competition that happens. It’s a game called ‘Find What’s Wrong With This Shot’. And there’s always going to be something wrong, because everything’s subjective. And you can micromanage it down to a pixel, and that happens all the time. We’re doing it digitally, so there’s no pressure to save on film costs or whatever, so it’s not unusual to go through 500 revisions of the same shot, moving pixels around and scrutinizing this or that. That’s not how you manage artists. You encourage artists, and then you’ll get – you know – art. If your idea of managing artists is just pointing out what’s wrong and making them fix it over and over again, you end up with artists who just stand around asking “OK lady, where do you want this sofa? You want it over there? No? Fine. You want it over there? I don’t give a fuck. I’ll put it wherever you want it.” It’s creative mismanagement, it’s part of the whole corporate modality. The fish stinks from the head on down. Back on Star Wars, Robocop, we never thought about what was wrong with a shot. We just thought about how to make it better.

From Phil Tippett himself…
Tippett Studio would like to clarify what we feel was a misleading headline and article in HollywoodReporter.com today.
Given the current climate and environment affecting movies and visual effects production today, Tippett Studio has made a business decision, as we routinely do, to reduce our contract-based work force as the projects ebb and flow through our doors. 
Staffing up is easy. Scaling down is not. It’s always an emotionally challenging thing, because we are a company of artists, run by artists. By doing a slow scale-down as tasks and projects complete, we aim to keep our employees on as long as we can, and to bring them back as soon as possible.
We are not immune to the problems our colleagues are experiencing, but we are not in a period of crisis as a company with massive layoffs and bankruptcy. As a small, independent company, we are delighted when we have a series, such as the Twilight Saga,and then Ted that allowed us to maintain a sizable workforce year after year.
As we wrap our current work on After Earth, we have been slowly scaling down the work force and reducing our overhead, until we have something large enough to justify carrying a large staff, so that we can be here when our clients call. We are retaining our core talent, and will use that talent to re-staff the studio when larger projects, that need more artists, are in production.
———
Creativity of Death

From Phil Tippett himself…

Tippett Studio would like to clarify what we feel was a misleading headline and article in HollywoodReporter.com today.

Given the current climate and environment affecting movies and visual effects production today, Tippett Studio has made a business decision, as we routinely do, to reduce our contract-based work force as the projects ebb and flow through our doors. 

Staffing up is easy. Scaling down is not. It’s always an emotionally challenging thing, because we are a company of artists, run by artists. By doing a slow scale-down as tasks and projects complete, we aim to keep our employees on as long as we can, and to bring them back as soon as possible.

We are not immune to the problems our colleagues are experiencing, but we are not in a period of crisis as a company with massive layoffs and bankruptcy. As a small, independent company, we are delighted when we have a series, such as the Twilight Saga,and then Ted that allowed us to maintain a sizable workforce year after year.

As we wrap our current work on After Earth, we have been slowly scaling down the work force and reducing our overhead, until we have something large enough to justify carrying a large staff, so that we can be here when our clients call. We are retaining our core talent, and will use that talent to re-staff the studio when larger projects, that need more artists, are in production.

———

Creativity of Death

"Effects you never knew were there"By Ian FailesJune 26, 2012
FXGuide’s article includes a run down on the effects we made for Hemingway and Gellhorn by VFX Sup Chris Morley, where he mentions he totally rad, tops as, cool as Kim Deal, VFX Assistant extraordinaire Nathan Hackett.
Tops as…
http://www.fxguide.com/featured/effects-you-never-knew-were-there/?fb_action_ids=10150931273998752&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582

"Effects you never knew were there"
By Ian Failes
June 26, 2012

FXGuide’s article includes a run down on the effects we made for Hemingway and Gellhorn by VFX Sup Chris Morley, where he mentions he totally rad, tops as, cool as Kim Deal, VFX Assistant extraordinaire Nathan Hackett.

Tops as…

http://www.fxguide.com/featured/effects-you-never-knew-were-there/?fb_action_ids=10150931273998752&fb_action_types=og.likes&fb_source=aggregation&fb_aggregation_id=288381481237582

Philip Kaufman will be holding a Master Class at this years Cannes Film Festival along with a screening of his new film Hemingway & Gellhorn.
I would LOVE to be at Cannes this year to not only hear Phil speak, but see H&G in all it’s film glory.  Last time I saw it was one of the early edits where it was about 3 hours long.  After that, I worked on the Visual Effects over at Tippett and got to see all the VFX magic being made by the guys and gals at Tippett under the eye of VFX Sup CMO (Chris Morley).
If you are in France, do yourself a favour and listen to Phil talk.  He is a pioneer with vision and a love for film and its craft.  He is a true film artist.  Someone I am lucky to now, thanks to H&G, know.
http://www.cinematografo.it/cinematografo_new/allegati/21763/Cannes2012_programma.pdf

Philip Kaufman will be holding a Master Class at this years Cannes Film Festival along with a screening of his new film Hemingway & Gellhorn.

I would LOVE to be at Cannes this year to not only hear Phil speak, but see H&G in all it’s film glory.  Last time I saw it was one of the early edits where it was about 3 hours long.  After that, I worked on the Visual Effects over at Tippett and got to see all the VFX magic being made by the guys and gals at Tippett under the eye of VFX Sup CMO (Chris Morley).

If you are in France, do yourself a favour and listen to Phil talk.  He is a pioneer with vision and a love for film and its craft.  He is a true film artist.  Someone I am lucky to now, thanks to H&G, know.

http://www.cinematografo.it/cinematografo_new/allegati/21763/Cannes2012_programma.pdf

Prehistoric Beast

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prehistoric_Beast

Phil Tippett’s Prehistoric Beast is now available to watch on You Tube….

This stop motion short film, made in a garage in 1984, was the catalyst that launched the wild idea of creating an independent business whose sole purpose was to create animation for movies. And so began Tippett Studio (where I now work).

Phil sort of had an inkling that Dinosaurs might be once again popular as PB preceded a wave of popular interest in dinosaurs spurred on in 1990 with the publishing of Michael Crichton’s book, Jurassic Park and the subsequent blockbuster movie by Steven Spielberg in 1993.

GOLD